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Lent: A Season of Giving

Elise+Mouton+%28%E2%80%9818%29+and+Kristen+Tanner+%28%E2%80%9818%29+bake+cookies+for+Mona%E2%80%99s+Munchies%2C+an+organization+that+brings+homemade+sweets+to+the+patients+and+families+being+served+at+Hospice+of+Acadiana%2C+as+part+of+their+Lenten+service.+%C2%A0Photo+taken+by+Wendy+Mouton.
Elise Mouton (‘18) and Kristen Tanner (‘18) bake cookies for Mona’s Munchies, an organization that brings homemade sweets to the patients and families being served at Hospice of Acadiana, as part of their Lenten service.  Photo taken by Wendy Mouton.

Elise Mouton (‘18) and Kristen Tanner (‘18) bake cookies for Mona’s Munchies, an organization that brings homemade sweets to the patients and families being served at Hospice of Acadiana, as part of their Lenten service.  Photo taken by Wendy Mouton.

Wendy Mouton

Wendy Mouton

Elise Mouton (‘18) and Kristen Tanner (‘18) bake cookies for Mona’s Munchies, an organization that brings homemade sweets to the patients and families being served at Hospice of Acadiana, as part of their Lenten service.  Photo taken by Wendy Mouton.

Tatum Guidry, Staff Writer

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What comes to mind when one hears the word “Lent”?  Some are disgruntled at the thought of not consuming chocolate or soda for 40 days, while other focus on having to eat a Filet-o-Fish every Friday.

These sacrifices are not supposed to make us feel sad, but contrastingly, they are supposed to give us joy in knowing that we are equipping ourselves with what we need to grow in our relationship with our Holy Father.

STM Chaplain Joe Breaux explained, during Lent, we “look at ourselves and decide what we need to do to better ourselves and make life more fruitful in the upcoming Church year.”  The things we sacrifice and penances we commit to are supposed to “give us the nutrients from God that we need to make our lives and relationship with Him more fruitful.”

Mary Clare Kramer (‘18) attend adoration at Our Lady of Wisdom every Monday night as part of her Lenten penance.  Additionally, she goes to Downtown Lafayette with STM alumni Lianne Dick every Thursday evening; the two, along with other volunteers, feed the homeless people of our community.

“When I attend these events, I offer my time up for those in need — those who need help and prayers.”  With such beautiful meaning behind her Lenten actions, Mary Clare is finding it more and more enjoyable each week.  She is receiving the fruits necessary to grow during this special time before Easter.

The St. Thomas More community, as a whole, is participating in a spiritual exercise that has been coined “Soup and Silence.” Each Friday in Lent, students are invited to report to Room 808 where they are served soup, bread, and water.

The Monastic tradition of eating meals in silence is also observed during this lunch.  Readings are given to those who participate that they reflect on as they eat. “Soup and Silence” is an opportunity to do “an act of sacrificial reparation for our individual and collective intentions.”

Joseph Benton (‘18) attended this past Friday and gave his account of the special time during his lunch period.  “The silence is a much-needed break from the noise that surrounds every day here at school.”

Tyler Boudreaux (‘21) chose to give up all drinks with the exception of water during these forty days before Easter, although it has proven to be very difficult.  

During the Crossroads retreat, everyone at his table was enjoying a Coke or Dr. Pepper or Sprite, which made him long for the day when he could again have one, too.  However, he powered through and drank solely water.

Ann Clare Fremin (‘19) is abstaining from wearing makeup and using social media.  The choice to give up social media was made to allow her “more time and energy to focus on growing (her) relationship with God.”  Abandoning her daily make-up routine, on the other hand, is a practice of self-denial.

As she reflected on the first week and a half of doing these penances, she appreciates the opportunity it has given her to think about what is truly important in life and, in contrast, what is not.

Fasting is one of the three pillars of the Christian faith and has been around since the days of the early church.  Our Chancellor, Fr. Russo, expanded on this important concept in his own Lenten reflection.

“The danger of our society is to say that if you can afford something you like, you deserve to have it!  You need to buy it! And then comes our Jesus.” He asks us to fast.

 

 

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Lent: A Season of Giving